DIGITALRULES.org

Florian Stahl @ May 28, 2013 8:46 pm

The Impact of Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement on Open Source Software Project Success

Weblog Category: Business Strategy,Technology

A research paper which investigates how intellectual property rights (IPR) enforcement against developers and users of open source software (OSS) affects the success of related OSS projects will appear soon in the journal Information System Research

The Impact of Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement on Open Source Software Project Success

Wen Wen, Chris Forman  and Stuart J. H. Graham

Abstract:

We investigate how intellectual property rights (IPR) enforcement against developers and users of open source software (OSS) affects the success of related OSS projects. We hypothesize that when an IPR enforcement action is filed, user interest and developer activity will be negatively affected in two types of related OSS projects—those that display technology overlap with the OSS application in dispute and business projects that are specific to the disputed OSS platform. We examine two widely publicized lawsuits—SCO v. IBM and FireStar/DataTern v. Red Hat—using data from SourceForge.net. Our difference-in-difference estimates show that in the months following the filing of SCO v. IBM, OSS projects that exhibit high technology overlap with the disputed OSS experienced a 15% greater decline in user interest and 45% less developer activity than projects in the control group; OSS projects that are intended for business and specific to the disputed OSS platform had a 34% greater decline in user interest and 86% less developer activity than the control group. We find similar results following the filing of FireStar/DataTern v. Red Hat. Our results are also robust to a variety of robustness checks, including a falsification exercise and subsample analyses.

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Florian Stahl @ March 24, 2013 3:26 pm

Information in Digital, Economic, and Social Networks

Arun Sundararajan, Foster Provost, Gal Oestreicher-Singer and Sinan Aral provides an comprehensive summary of research focusing on “information in networks”—its distribution, its diffusion, its inferential value, and its influence on social and economic outcomes. This summary will be published soon in the journal Information System Research

Information in Digital, Economic, and Social Networks

Abstract:

Digital technologies have made networks ubiquitous. A growing body of research is examining these networks to gain a better understanding of how firms interact with their consumers, how people interact with each other, and how current and future digital artifacts will continue to alter business and society. The increasing availability of massive networked data has led to several streams of inquiry across fields as diverse as computer science, economics, information systems, marketing, physics, and sociology. Each of these research streams asks questions that at their core involve “information in networks”—its distribution, its diffusion, its inferential value, and its influence on social and economic outcomes. We suggest a broad direction for research into social and economic networks. Our analysis describes four kinds of investigation that seem most promising. The first studies how information technologies create and reveal networks whose connections represent social and economic relationships. The second examines the content that flows through networks and its economic, social, and organizational implications. A third develops theories and methods to understand and utilize the rich predictive information contained in networked data. A final area of inquiry focuses on network dynamics and how information technology affects network evolution. We conclude by discussing several important cross-cutting issues with implications for all four research streams, which must be addressed if the ensuing research is to be both rigorous and relevant. We also describe how these directions of inquiry are interconnected: results and ideas will pollinate across them, leading to a new cumulative research tradition.

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Florian Stahl @ April 23, 2012 11:28 am

Social Media Prism

Weblog Category: Business Strategy,Technology

Companies are using some specific social media, but d0n´t know the whole range of social media available. A great variety of social media exists already catering to all niches, uses and target groups. Usually social media is understood to be an isolated application limited exclusively to one site, such as Facebook. Brian Solis’s Conversation Prism offers an clear and detailed overview about all social media available.

 

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Florian Stahl @ March 19, 2012 6:47 am

State of the News Media 2012

Weblog Category: Market Development,Technology

Recently the new annual report “State of the News Media 2012” got published.

The annual State of the News Media report is a comprehensive analysis of the health of journalism in America, which includes detailed analysis of eight different media sectors as well as an overview that identifies key trends and key findings of the essential statistics about news in the last year.

Abstract:

The State of the News Media 2012 is the ninth edition of our annual report on the status of American journalism.
This year’s study contains surveys examining how news consumers use social media and how mobile devcies could change the news business and an update on the rapid changes in community news. And each industry sector chapter consists of two parts: a summary essay, which tells the story of that sector, and a data section, which presents a full range of statistics graphically rendered. The report is the work of the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism a nonpolitical, nonpartisan research institute funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Chapters of the report:

 

Overview:

By Amy Mitchell  and Tom Rosenstiel (taken from  stateofthemedia.org)

The age of mobile, in which people are connected to the web wherever they are, arrived in earnest. More than four in ten American adults now own a smartphone. One in five owns a tablet. New cars are manufactured with internet built in. With more mobility comes deeper immersion into social networking.

For news, the new era brings mixed blessings.

New research released in this report finds that mobile devices are adding to people’s news consumption, strengthening the lure of traditional news brands and providing a boost to long-form journalism. Eight in ten who get news on smartphones or tablets, for instance, get news on conventional computers as well. People are taking advantage, in other words, of having easier access to news throughout the day – in their pocket, on their desks and in their laps.

At the same time, a more fundamental challenge that we identified in this report last year has intensified — the extent to which technology intermediaries now control the future of news.

Two trends in the last year overlap and reinforce the sense that the gap between the news and technology industries is widening. First, the explosion of new mobile platforms and social media channels represents another layer of technology with which news organizations must keep pace.

Second, in the last year a small number of technology giants began rapidly moving to consolidate their power by becoming makers of “everything” in our digital lives. Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple and a few others are maneuvering to make the hardware people use, the operating systems that run those devices, the browsers on which people navigate, the e-mail services on which they communicate, the social networks on which they share and the web platforms on which they shop and play. And all of this will provide these companies with detailed personal data about each consumer.

Click Here to Continue Reading the Overview

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Florian Stahl @ November 12, 2011 8:54 am

Music Downloads and the Flip Side of Digital Rights Management

Weblog Category: Business Strategy,Technology

New Article about digital right management in Marketing Science

Music Downloads and the Flip Side of Digital Rights Management

By Dinah A. Vernik, Devavrat Purohit and Preyas S. Desai

Digital rights management (DRM) is an important yet controversial issue in the information goods markets. Although DRM is supposed to help copyright owners by protecting digital content from illegal copying or distribution, it is controversial because DRM imposes restrictions on even legal users, and there are many industry practitioners who believe that the industry would be better off without DRM. In this paper, we model consumers’ utilities and their incentives to purchase legal products versus pirate illegal ones. This allows us to endogenize the level of piracy and understand how it is influenced by the presence or absence of DRM. Our analysis suggests that, counterintuitively, download piracy might decrease when the firm allows legal DRM-free downloads. Furthermore, we find that a decrease in piracy does not guarantee an increase in firm profits and that that copyright owners do not always benefit from making it harder to copy music illegally. By analyzing the competition among the traditional retailer, the digital retailer, and pirated sources of information goods, we get a better understanding of the competitive forces in the market and provide insights into the role of digital rights management.

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Florian Stahl @ October 30, 2011 11:18 am

Learning Similarity Metrics for Event Identification in Social Media

Weblog Category: Technology

Related to the importance of social media ROI, I found recently an research paper discussing how content on social media sites can be automatically linked to real world events.

Learning Similarity Metrics for Event Identification in Social Media

By Hila Becker (Columbia University), Mor Naaman (Rutgers University), Luis Gravano (Columbia University)

Abstract:
Social media sites (e.g., Flickr, YouTube, and Facebook) are a popular distribution outlet for users looking to share their experiences and interests on the Web. These sites host substantial amounts of user-contributed materials (e.g., photographs, videos, and textual content) for a wide variety of real-world events of di erent type and scale. By automatically identifying these events and their associated user-contributed social media documents, which is the focus of this paper, we can enable event browsing and search in state-of-the-art search engines. To address this problem, we exploit the rich \context” associated with social media content, including user-provided annotations (e.g., title, tags) and automatically generated information (e.g., content creation time). Using this rich context, which includes both textual and non-textual features, we can de ne appropriate document similarity metrics to enable online clustering of media to events. As a key contribution of this paper, we explore a variety of techniques for learning multi-feature similarity metrics for social media documents in a principled manner. We evaluate our techniques on large-scale, real-world datasets of event images from Flickr. Our evaluation results suggest that our approach identi es events, and their associated social media documents, more e ectively than the state-of-the-art strategies on which we build.

 

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Florian Stahl @ September 26, 2011 7:33 pm

An Empirical Analysis of User Content Generation and Usage Behavior on the Mobile Internet

Weblog Category: Consumer Behavior,Technology

New Articles related to the Digital Economy in Management Science

An Empirical Analysis of User Content Generation and Usage Behavior on the Mobile Internet

By Anindya Ghose and Sang Pil Han

Abstract:
We quantify how user mobile Internet usage relates to unique characteristics of the mobile Internet. In particular, we focus on examining how the mobile-phone-based content generation behavior of users relates to content usage behavior. The key objective is to analyze whether there is a positive or negative interdependence between the two activities. We use a unique panel data set that consists of individual-level mobile Internet usage data that encompass individual multimedia content generation and usage behavior. We combine this knowledge with data on user calling patterns, such as duration, frequency, and locations from where calls are placed, to construct their social network and to compute their geographical mobility. We build an individual-level simultaneous equation panel data model that controls for the different sources of endogeneity of the social network. We find that there is a negative and statistically significant temporal interdependence between content generation and usage. This finding implies that an increase in content usage in the previous period has a negative impact on content generation in the current period and vice versa. The marginal effect of this interdependence is stronger on content usage (up to 8.7%) than on content generation (up to 4.3%). The extent of geographical mobility of users has a positive effect on their mobile Internet activities. Users more frequently engage in content usage compared to content generation when they are traveling. In addition, the variance of user mobility has a stronger impact on their mobile Internet activities than does the mean. We also find that the social network has a strong positive effect on user behavior in the mobile Internet. These analyses unpack the mechanisms that stimulate user behavior on the mobile Internet. Implications for shaping user mobile Internet usage behavior are discussed.

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Florian Stahl @ September 12, 2011 1:28 pm

Blog, Blogger, and the Firm: Can Negative Employee Posts Lead to Positive Outcomes?

Weblog Category: Business Strategy,Technology

A research paper with counterintuitive results about corporate blogging will appear soon in the journal Information System Research

Blog, Blogger, and the Firm: Can Negative Employee Posts Lead to Positive Outcomes?

By Rohit Aggarwal, Ram Gopal, Ramesh Sankaranarayanan, Param Vir Singh

Abstract:
Consumer-generated media, particularly blogs, can help companies increase the visibility of their products without spending millions of dollars in advertising. Although a number of companies realize the potential of blogs and encourage their employees to blog, a good chunk of them are skeptical about losing control over this new media. Companies fear that employees may write negative things about them and that this may bring significant reputation loss. Overall, companies show mixed response toward negative posts on employee blogs—some companies show complete aversion; others allow some negative posts. Such mixed reactions toward negative posts motivated us to probe for any positive aspects of negative posts. In particular, we investigate the relationship between negative posts and readership of an employee blog.

In contrast to the popular perception, our results reveal a potential positive aspect of negative posts. Our analysis suggests that negative posts act as catalyst and can exponentially increase the readership of employee blogs, suggesting that companies should permit employees to make negative posts. Because employees typically write few negative posts and largely write positive posts, the increase in readership of employee blogs generally should be enough to offset the negative effect of few negative posts. Therefore, not restraining negative posts to increase readership should be a good strategy. This raises a logical question: what should a firm’s policy be regarding employee blogging? For exposition, we suggest an analytical framework using our empirical model.

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Florian Stahl @ September 11, 2011 3:24 pm

Optimal Software Free Trial Strategy: The Impact of Network Externalities and Consumer Uncertainty

A paper related to optimal sampling strategies of information goods will appear soon in the journal Information System Research

Optimal Software Free Trial Strategy: The Impact of Network Externalities and Consumer Uncertainty

By Hsing Kenneth Cheng and Yipeng Liu

Abstract:
Many software firms offer a fully functional version of their products free of charge, for a limited trial period, to ease consumers’ uncertainty about the functionalities of their products and to help the diffusion of their new software. This paper examines the trade-off between the effects of reduced uncertainty and demand cannibalization, uncovers the condition under which software firms should introduce the time-locked free trial software, and finds the optimal free trial time. As software firms have the option of providing free trial software with full functionalities but a limited trial time or limited functionalities for an unlimited trial time, we develop a unified framework to provide useful guidelines for deciding which free trial strategy is preferred in the presence of network externalities and consumer uncertainty.

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